When-is-the-right-time-to-get-help-for-GCSEs-and-A-levels?

It can be quite difficult to spot that your child needs help coming up to their GCSEs or A levels; they want to be independent and frankly don’t always know they need help. Tutor My Kids offers some pointers to help decide.

Ask the question.

It’s always worth asking your teenager which subjects they’re finding hard – it may be the subject matter, the way it’s taught or how well they get on with their teacher. It’s worth asking the question of school too. Schools and colleges are pretty direct these days – many teachers will say if they think a private tutor may help.

Mock results.

Mock results are invariably below the grades your child will get, because they’ve got another 6 months+ to go at this point, but if they’re significantly different from the result they were expecting, it could be helpful to get a private tutor to help with GCSEs or A levels. If your child has any learning difficulties, it’s also worth asking if they can get extra time in the exams. Take a look at Could my child get extra time for GCSEs and A levels?

What grades do they need?

The government are now insisting all students get GCSE maths and English and it certainly easier to get these done in year 11 with the other GCSEs, than have them hanging over into year 12 or 13. Take a look at  the new GCSE grades for information on the new grading systems.

Does your child need a specific grade to get into their sixth form, university or apprenticeship choice?

How can a private tutor help?

A private GCSE or A level tutor can help in all sorts of ways. Firstly they can help with subject knowledge – filling in any gaps which your child has not fully understood. Secondly, they can advise on where to pick up marks. Many of our tutors also mark or set exam papers, so have a really good understanding of where marks can be gained and lost. Finally, confidence should not be underestimated, a student who is confident of his or her abilities is invariably calmer and more relaxed going into the exams, which means they’ll suffer less from exam anxiety and perform better.

When is the right time to get help from a private tutor?

Whilst it is always good to be guided by your child and by school, as a provider of private A level and GCSE tutors in Cambridge and surrounding areas, at Tutor My Kids we’re also aware that availability of good tutors drops rapidly the closer it gets to the exams.

They’re in year 10 – is this too early?

This depends on your child. If they’re very far behind the grade that they need in year 11, they may well be value in finding a private tutor in year 10.

How do I find a good tutor?

At Tutor My Kids we’re biased, but we think that teachers make the best private tutors. Almost all our private tutors in the Cambridgeshire area are teachers. Teachers know how to put across the information well; it’s what they do everyday. We also believe that the personality fit between the tutor and student is as important as their subject knowledge, so we always visit our clients personally and always interview our tutors face to face to ensure a great match. Personal recommendation is always a good way to find a good tutor and we’re always delighted by how many of our clients recommend us to their friends and colleagues. And of course, our tutors are all DBS checked.

If you’re sourcing a tutor yourself, do ask for testimonials from present or previous clients and check them out.

For more information, please email Rachel Law or call her for an informal chat on 01223 858421.

 

 

Could my child get extra time for GCSEs and A levels?

How could my child qualify for extra time in his/her GCSEs or A levels?

Qualification for extra time in the exams is ultimately down to your child’s school to decide, but there are various factors which might mean that your child would benefit from extra time. If your child has dyslexic tendencies – click the link to download our Dyslexia Questionnaire,your child may be able to get extra time in the exams. Children with working memory issues may also be able to qualify for extra time.

Which exams are eligible?

UK GCSEs and GCEs (A levels) and BTech are eligible for extra time.

How could I apply for extra time?

At Tutor My Kids, we always point you to the SENCo (Special Educational Needs Coordinator) at your child’s school first because they know your child’s educational history and can best advise.

However, sometimes, schools don’t have the time or funding to assess all the pupils who might benefit from exam time and it’s useful to be able to do this testing privately.

How does it work?

If you think your child may be eligible for extra time in some exams, speak to the SENCo first. The SENCo needs to fill out the first part of a form, called a ‘JCQ (Joint Council for qualifications) Form 8’. Then school or Tutor My Kids can assess your child and complete the rest of the form to see if extra time can be gained?

What do I need to be aware of?

Firstly, submitting a form 8 is no guarantee of getting extra time.

Secondly, the school’s SENCo (special educational needs co-ordinator) will need to fill out the first part of the form.

Thirdly, the concessions are applied for by exam subject, so you might get extra time in one exam, such as English, but not another, say maths.

Finally, the school would ultimately make the final decision if extra time will be awarded.

How does private testing work?

Have a look at the Dyslexia Questionnaire first.

Get in touch with school’s SENCo to see if they think a ‘Form 8’ would be successful and if they’d be prepared to submit one.

If they’re not willing or able to submit an application, would they fill out the information to enable the test to be done by Tutor My Kids?

Once you’ve had the ‘Form 8’ filled out by your school’s SENCO, we book for our qualified assessor to assess your child.

The assessor (using various standardised tests) will assess your child and fill out the ‘Form 8’ with the results.

How far will Tutor My Kids’ assessors travel?

Our Tutor My Kids assessors will travel up to 15 miles from Cambridge to do the assessment. It can usually be done at their school.

How long will it take?

The testing takes up to an hour, depending on the tests done.

What are the costs?

Fees for the testing, completion and submission to JCQ are £180.

What’s the deadline for summer 2018 exams?

Deadline for the submission of the form 8 (with SENCo comments) is end Jan 2018.

Who can I discuss it with first?

The school SENCo is a great place to start, especially, if your child is already having help from the school. Please also feel free to call Rachel Law on 01223 858421 or email her at hello@tutormykids.co.uk

 

Why-we-get-such-great-results-at-Tutor-My-Kids.

Private tutors Cambirdgeshire

 

 

 

 

 

What is it that we do that is so very different?

Well I think, as ever, it’s rarely one thing, but a combination of several things which together form something quite incredible.

We’re small and local

Founded in 2011 by Rachel Law, a teacher and mum, we’re based in Ely, Cambridgeshire.

We know all our tutors personally, so we know their background and experience. We know what they’re good at and what they’re really great at! We talk with them regularly and we’re one big team.

Our tutors are amazing

We have amazing tutors. We are pretty picky – with a few exceptions, all our tutors are qualified teachers. Teachers have the curriculum experience and years of experience to understand how to get that information across to students with a huge variety of different learning styles. It’s what teachers do day in, day out; it’s our stock in trade.

Our teachers have the academic underpinning and understanding to know which learning blocks build information and how to rebuild the missing ones.

If you’re a teacher who’d like to find out about Becoming a Tutor My Kids tutor, click the link, email Rachel or call Rachel Law on 01223 646421 for a friendly and informal chat.

Our clients are amazing

We have great clients who simply want to give their children more confidence in their learning. We’re blessed with appreciative clients who are generous enough to recommend us to their friends, colleagues and family.

For more information about Tutor My Kids or private tuition in Cambridgeshire, please click the links.

For us, it’s personal

Rachel visits all our clients in their home to ensure that we understand what is needed academically, but also to get a feel for how the student learns and which tutors would be the best fit for your family and child. Rachel also interviews all our teachers personally, face-to-face. We feel that the personality fit between tutor and student is equally important. As a primary school teacher, Rachel is also able to assess many of our students to understand where their strengths lie and discover areas where we can help to improve understanding and confidence.

We’re joined-up

With our clients permission, we liaise with the student’s class or subject teacher to supplement the information from the initial assessment. Our clients are invariably hugely supportive of their child’s teachers, but just feel that the teacher can’t devote the one-to-one time to their child that they’d like. Many parents worry that the teacher may be ‘put out’ if they get a tutor. This couldn’t be further from the truth; all teachers want the best for all their pupils and almost without exception are just delighted that the pupil is getting some extra help to support them.

We stay in touch

Our tutors feedback to our parents after each session to explain how it’s gone – what’s been good, what needs more work etc. In addition, Rachel stays in touch with our parents and tutors too throughout the tutoring, to ensure that it’s all going to plan and helping out with any issues or concerns.

We love seeing great results

We’re all hard-wired to love seeing great results from the tuition  – it’s one of Rachel’s greatest joys –  The best bit of my job! We just love helping people to thrive and giving kids confidence.

We’re positive

All our teachers are positive, upbeat people who bring a ray of light with them. They’re a joy to have around and without doubt this rubs off on to our pupils and their families.

What makes us brilliant?

So, I think it’s being small enough to know our tutors and clients well, having amazing, positive teachers who bring a rush of energy and positivity with them. It’s joining up with schools so we have the fullness picture we can of the student’s needs, keeping our clients up to date with progress and loving seeing kids learn, thrive and gain confidence. And feeding back to our parents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3-Things-to-Do-with-Your-Kids-Over-the-Summer

Mum helping her daughter learn

There are 3 key things to help your kids with over the summer.

Reading

Regular reading is always a great thing to help your child. For young children, read to them and with them, reading the tricky words for them. Aim for daily if at all possible; as with all things, a few minutes a day is more beneficial than an hour at the weekend.  As they get older, encourage them to read to themselves too. For older kids, getting ahead of GCSE and A level texts ahead of September can be a great help. Not all kids love reading – try getting them reading on a kindle, tablet or audio books. There is definitely a link between reading and writing; those children who read a lot tend to use better word choices in their written work.

Writing

Take a look at your child’s school report and see if school have highlighted any particular ‘next steps’ – using capital letters, commas, better word choices etc. Writing a daily journal can be a great thing for children (maybe invest in a gorgeous notebook specially for that purpose), book reviews, letters to relatives (who doesn’t like to receive a hand-written note), hand-made greetings cards, shopping lists etc.

Also take a look at How to make writing easy for kids #1 and How to make writing easy for kids #2

For older children, time spent getting ahead of texts for GCSEs and A levels over the summer can be invaluable – taking notes, mindmapping (https://mindmapsunleashed.com/10-really-cool-mind-mapping-examples-you-will-learn-from and revision cards, can be a great help.

Handwriting

Handwriting formation is a great one to crack over the summer, when you’ve got a little more time on your hands. Just check with your school that you’re following the correct style for your school. Most schools teach joined up writing because it’s thought to help spelling if you join up the word in one sweep (it’s from NLP – a thought and an action combined). However, it’s important to get the individual letter formation correct first. Some children can be rushed into joining before this is secure. This site is a great one for advice and help, from another teacher and parent, and includes free handwriting resources. http://www.teachhandwriting.co.uk/

Maths

For children in years 1-2, a thorough knowledge of numbers – which ones add up to 10 and 20 (these are called number bonds). Learning doubles, halves and random single digit sums (e.g 5+7) are invaluable skills to work on. A good way to practise this is to make a game out of it. Get a 0-9 dice (type ‘0-9 sided dice’ into Amazon or ebay or use a random number generator) and throw them randomly to generate 2 numbers to add. You can throw twice for older children to get 2 digit numbers (e.g. 23 + 68). Again, 5 minutes daily is much more effective than an hour at the weekend. Children relying on adding with their fingers isn’t wrong at all, but it slows children down, especially as the maths gets harder.  It also stops these problems becoming entrenched later down the line. Our tutors in Cambridgeshire and I have seen many GCSE students who still add up basic numbers on their fingers whilst being able to do Trigonometry and other much complex maths.

Also take a look at How to make maths easy for kids #1How to make maths easy for kids #2 and How to make maths easy for kids #3

From KS2 (years 3-6) onwards, times tables are the back bone of maths success. Practise these so your kids can say them in random order and know the corresponding division facts. 25÷5=5.

For secondary age kids, after the basics (number bonds – numbers adding up to 10, 20 ,100 etc), doubles/halves, times tables), ensure that the formulae are known – area of a circle, Pythagoras, trig etc. My maths and other such sites are great for tutorials and practising tricky areas (fractions, percentages, decimals etc) over the summer too.

For more information about Tutor My Kids or private tuition in Cambridgeshire, please click the links.

If you’re a teacher who’d like to find out about Becoming a Tutor My Kids tutor, click the link, email Rachel or call Rachel Law on 01223 646421 for a friendly and informal chat.

Thanks for reading. Speak soon,

Rachel.

Rachel Law is the founder of Tutor My Kids, a teacher and a mum.

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Tuition – A great help or pushy parenting?

At first glance, it might look like pushy parenting, but it’s easy to forget stuff!

We all forget things if we don’t do them regularly. Can you remember passwords for websites that you rarely use – no me neither! PIN numbers for accounts you don’t use very often – yep guilty!

Kids are no different, they forget things.

It’s long been recognised by teachers that kids learning can take a backward step over the summer holidays, but is this true or an urban myth? Take a look at the research.

Many of our teachers who work as private tutors in Ely and Cambridge area report that without repetition children can forget things that they’ve learnt the prior to the holidays. Many of our private tutors work through the school summer holidays to keep the children’s learning active over the holiday.

I teach a day a week at a local school in the Ely area. The year before last, I kept the same class as they went up a year. (They left me in August as year 3s and re-joined me as year 4s in Sept). I was quite surprised by how much they had forgotten from the end of July to Sept. It’s rare you get the opportunity to experience the effect so directly. Hardly surprising when there’s so much going on in the holidays. All those ice-creams to be eaten, friends to see and places to visit.

Does it really matter?

For many kids it doesn’t matter that they forget things because topics will be covered again in the next academic year.  The education system is designed to allow for this. Also, you’ll most likely be reading with them or they can read independently and they’ll be experiencing other things whilst on holiday or out for day trips

What are the problems with this?

With increased focus on covering more topics in the curriculum, it does mean that it can be at a pace which is too quick for some children.

For many kids little and often work well to keep ideas fresh. High degrees of repetition help to keep ideas and way to solve problems front of mind.  Our tutors in Ely, Huntingdon and Cambridge, are aware of this and generally plan to repeat areas to ensure retention.

Shouldn’t kids have a rest in the holidays.

Absolutely! Kids should have downtime to chill, be a bit bored and enjoy time with family and friends. I think our children do need to have this time to relax and recuperate. In fact, I’d recommend not planning too many organised events so kids can make up their own play, games and do all that lovely old fashioned stuff like building dens in the garden. Limit screen time and get them outdoors.

But, the two aren’t mutually exclusive. It’s still possible to do this and incorporate 4-6 hours tuition over the WHOLE of the summer holidays, a 1 hour, weekly session without impinging on this time.

 Do I need a tutor? Can I do it myself?

At Tutor My Kids our tutors are qualified teachers, which we feel is important, especially at primary level, because the ways in which maths and English are taught in school is entirely different to the ways in which most parents were taught.

However, there are things you can do to help your own kids, without question. The main things are to read with your kids regularly, practise handwriting, play some maths games and get them to write a journal, diary or letters to keep these skills up.  Take a look at our news to see various blogs on how to help your kids learn.

For more information about Tutor My Kids or private tuition in Cambridgeshire, please click the links.

If you’re a teacher who’d like to find out about Becoming a Tutor My Kids tutor, click the link, email Rachel or call Rachel Law on 01223 646421 for a friendly and informal chat.

Thanks for reading. Speak soon,

Rachel.

 

The-Best-Bit-of-my-job

Tutor My Kids
Tutor My Kids

I love my job! I love helping kids who have lost confidence find their confidence again and get a renewed interest in their learning.

And the very best bit of that is talking to Tutor My Kids’ amazing tutors in Ely, Huntingdon, Newmarket and Cambridge and the students’ parents, hearing first hand how the tuition is going. I especially love that first call.

It’s natural that parents and students are going to feel anxious before the first session of private tuition, especially if they haven’t had a tutor before. Students and their parents wonder if they’ll get along with the tutor, if the tutor will be able to help them, if the tutor ‘will talk their language’ and be on the same wavelength as them. So the first call is always a great joy to know that all these anxieties have been swept away. Whilst our testimonials show how well we match our tutors to our students, many of our clients are delighted, but slightly surprised how well we achieve this.

I think it’s down to a number of key factors. We always visit our students and their parents/carers in their own home well so that we can gain a good understanding of their needs, but also their personality. I think a tutor who can connect with the individual student is as important as the tutor having the correct subject knowledge. We always interview our tutors face-to-face to ensure a great understanding of their skills and personality too. In many cases, I will do an initial academic assessment when I visit to get a feel for any specific areas which need to be addressed. This (with the parent/carers’ permission) is supplemented with information from the class or subject teacher at school. With my view, the school’s information and finally the tutor’s expertise, we have a real 360 degree view of the students needs. But is it just down to this great academic and personality matching?

With a few exceptions, all our tutors in Ely, Huntingdon, Newmarket and Cambridge (the areas we cover) are qualified teachers. Their many years of experience of their subjects is paramount, but how to get their learning across to a wide variety of different students who learn in a myriad of different ways, equally, if not, more valuable.

For more information about Tutor My Kids or private tuition in Cambridgeshire, please click the links.

If you’re a teacher who’d like to find out about Becoming a Tutor My Kids tutor, click the link, email Rachel or call Rachel Law on 01223 646421 for a friendly and informal chat.

For our other news and blogs, take a look here

Thanks for reading. Speak soon,

Rachel.

 

 

 

 

Working for Tutor My Kids has reminded me why I originally wanted to teach

TutorMyKids private tutor

I’m so grateful for this amazing testimonial from one of our amazing teachers who tutors in Ely.

‘Working for Tutor My Kids has reminded me why I originally wanted to teach – to make a difference in children’s learning and confidence, and see them progress.  As a senior manager for the last twelve years of my full time career, I got further and further away from the children and deeper and deeper into paperwork about why they weren’t progressing fast enough. Each child is an individual, has different needs and responds to different learning styles. The pupils I work with through TutorMyKids all benefit from a plan that I design specifically for them and deliver on a 1:1 basis. I see them progress and gain confidence through small steps – and realise that what I am doing is making that difference. Being a tutor with TutorMyKids is so rewarding – I have regained confidence in my teaching ability, working with delightful children and parents who enjoy seeing their children progress.’

I think this hits the nail on the head of why so many teachers are leaving the classroom and looking at other ways in which they can use their years of teaching experience in a way that is valued, that is acknowledged, has freedom and autonomy, enables teachers to do a great job (and feel like they are) and make a difference to pupils.

To get in touch, please email Rachel Law hello@tutormykids.co.uk or call her on 01223 858421
Look forward to hearing from you!

How do I become a private tutor?


Many teachers are leaving the profession or
changing the way they work – perhaps opting for part-time or supply teaching and/or
private tutoring. 

We’re increasingly being approached by great teachers who are
simply ‘greyed out’ by the politics and paperwork but don’t want to stop doing what they love – working with children.Teachers are looking at
other ways to use their skills.


Teacher are looking at new ways of working, often combining things together, such as part-time or supply teaching and private tuition. The supply situation seems to vary enormously across the
country, but in Cambridgeshire, there’s no shortage. Ditto with private tuition
– demand for private tutors in Cambridge, Ely, Huntingdon and surrounding areas
is high.

The following is a quick guide to setting up as a private
tutor:


Where do you want to tutor?

You will need to decide if you want to be a private tutor who sees clients at your home or the clients’ homes. There are pros and cons for both. Being a private tutor at home can be distracting if you have your own family or may work out fabulously because you’ve got all your resources there. You may prefer to travel to your clients so you can be fully focussed on your student and not worry about keeping your house tidy!

How much should I charge for private tuition?

This, again, is a personal choice. Take a look at what other tutors are charging and what you feel is a fair reflection of your time and experience.

How do I find clients?

If you want to find clients yourself, start telling people
that you’re going to work as a private tutor. Word of mouth will be your best
advertising. If you’re on Facebook, mention it there – even set yourself up a Facebook
page dedicated to your tutoring and don’t forget cards in the local shops. You
can also register yourself on the various tutor boards.

If you feel uncomfortable about selling yourself or you want
to get off the ground more quickly, you could consider an agency. Agencies vary
enormously in terms of their approach so speak to a few and see who you feel
you ‘click’ with.

Working with an agency means that you won’t have to sell yourself.
Go for an agency (such as Tutor My Kids in Cambridge) who visit their clients
personally first to ensure you know that you’re going somewhere safe and vetted
to work as a personal tutor. Most of our private tutors in Ely, Cambridge,
Huntingdon and surrounding areas are women. We think it’s really important that
we’ve visited the client’s home first. We only accept clients who we’re happy
with and also we do a great job of matching the needs of our students to your
skills and experience.

Some agencies simply match you with a client based on your
skills and the client’s requirements. E.g. if you teach GCSE maths and the client’s
child is sitting GCSE maths they’ll match you up.  Others offer a more personalised service. At Tutor
My Kids in Cambridge we view these things differently. It may be a GCSE maths
student (especially if taking the foundation paper) may benefit from a primary
trained maths tutor who can help fill in gaps that are preventing the student
from progressing fully. 

How do I get more clients?

At the end of the day, whether you find clients yourself or
through an agency, I’d suggest that you go with your instincts. If you feel
that you connect with the family/agency then great. If you’re really not sure
at all, then better not to start the assignment.  With the right client or agency, you’ll get
more bookings through word of mouth without fail.

How many clients are too many?

This is a personal thing, but if you feel you’re able to fit
in the prep and planning before the session to the best of your ability, then
you’re about right. If you’re struggling to find the time, then definitely don’t
take any more clients on. Doing things well will bring you more clients and
recommendations but be careful not to overstretch yourself.

Feeling Appreciated.

Schools can be tough at the moment, with sometimes little
praise. Being a private tutor for many teachers is a hugely liberating thing;
it reconnects them with seeing directly the link of their efforts to the child
and it’s also really lovely for teachers to be really valued by their clients and/or
agency. 


If you’re interested in becoming a private tutor in Cambridge, Ely, Huntingdon or Newmarket, please get in touch with Rachel Law on 01223 858421 or take a look at the Tutor My Kids Website www.Tutormykids.co.uk

How do I become a private tutor?

Many teachers are leaving the profession or changing the way they work – perhaps opting for part-time or supply teaching and/or private tutoring. 
 
We’re increasingly being approached by great teachers who are simply ‘greyed out’ by the politics and paperwork but don’t want to stop doing what they love – working with children.Teachers are looking at other ways to use their skills. Take a look at When was the last time a parent thanked you for teaching their child?
 
Teacher are looking at new ways of working, often combining things together, such as part-time or supply teaching and private tuition. The supply situation seems to vary enormously across the country, but in Cambridgeshire, there’s no shortage. Ditto with private tuition – demand for private tutors in Cambridge, Ely, Huntingdon and surrounding areas is high.
 

Here’s a quick guide to setting up as a private tutor:

Where do you want to tutor?

You will need to decide if you want to be a private tutor who sees clients at your home or the clients’ homes. There are pros and cons for both. Being a private tutor at home can be distracting if you have your own family or may work out fabulously because you’ve got all your resources there. You may prefer to travel to your clients so you can be fully focused on your student and not worry about keeping your house tidy! 

How much should I charge for private tuition?

This, again, is a personal choice. Take a look at what other tutors are charging and what you feel is a fair reflection of your time and experience.

How do I find clients?

If you want to find clients yourself, start telling people that you’re going to work as a private tutor. Word of mouth will be your best advertising. If you’re on Facebook, mention it there – even set yourself up a Facebook page dedicated to your tutoring and don’t forget cards in the local shops. You can also register yourself on the various tutor boards.
 
If you feel uncomfortable about selling yourself or you want to get off the ground more quickly, you could consider an agency. Agencies vary enormously in terms of their approach so speak to a few and see who you feel you ‘click’ with.
 
Working with an agency means that you won’t have to sell yourself. Go for an agency (such as Tutor My Kids in Cambridge) who visit their clients personally first to ensure you know that you’re going somewhere safe and vetted to work as a personal tutor. Most of our private tutors in Ely, Cambridge, Huntingdon and surrounding areas are women. We think it’s really important that we’ve visited the client’s home first. We only accept clients who we’re happy with and also we do a great job of matching the needs of our students to your skills and experience.
 
Some agencies simply match you with a client based on your skills and the client’s requirements. E.g. if you teach GCSE maths and the client’s child is sitting GCSE maths they’ll match you up.  Others offer a more personalised service. At Tutor My Kids in Cambridge we view these things differently. It may be a GCSE maths student (especially if taking the foundation paper) may benefit from a primary trained maths tutor who can help fill in gaps that are preventing the student from progressing fully. 

How do I get more clients?

At the end of the day, whether you find clients yourself or through an agency, I’d suggest that you go with your instincts. If you feel that you connect with the family/agency then great. If you’re really not sure at all, then better not to start the assignment.  With the right client or agency, you’ll get more bookings through word of mouth without fail.

How many clients are too many?

This is a personal thing, but if you feel you’re able to fit in the prep and planning before the session to the best of your ability, then you’re about right. If you’re struggling to find the time, then definitely don’t take any more clients on. Doing things well will bring you more clients and recommendations but be careful not to overstretch yourself. 

Feeling Appreciated.

Schools can be tough at the moment, with sometimes little praise. Being a private tutor for many teachers is a hugely liberating thing; it reconnects you with seeing directly the link of your efforts to the child and it’s also really lovely for you to be really valued by their clients and/or agency. 
 
If you’re interested in becoming a private tutor in Cambridge, Ely, Huntingdon or Newmarket, please get in touch with Rachel Law on 01223 858421 or take a look at the Tutor My Kids Website www.Tutormykids.co.uk

Dyslexia – Gift or curse?

I was discussing this with some of our personal tutors in Cambridge this week. We felt that we were a bit conflicted. It’s tempting to be swayed by high achieving individuals, such as Richard Branson, who firmly believe that the extra creative parts of dyslexia have been a huge help. In addition, that need to overcome these specific learning difficulties have been a pre-cursor to great wells of determination and tenacity. It’s great that dyslexia is being acknowledged and the stigmatisation of dyslexia is being removed. But is this everyone’s experience?
 
Many schools do a great job of supporting dyslexic children, by specific focused intervention plans, minimising the copying from whiteboards, offering different coloured paper, use of laptops and instructions given one at a time. Exams boards are set-up to give extra time to children who are dyslexic which can make a difference. 
 
My worry is, that by portraying dyslexia as a gift it minimises the discussion of the difficulties of dyslexia, in the classroom and in the world of work. Most companies are not set up to understand and help dyslexic adults with the difficulties they face. As adults we have a wider access to technology which makes it easier for dyslexic adults to be able to read and write with greater ease. Fortunately, gone are the days of hand writing a memo or letter, but technology isn’t a panacea. Word processors and speech to text and recognition (and visa versa) software are a great help.
 
What do you think? Gift or curse?